Table of Contents

  1. 0.00 INTRODUCTION: The Problem of School Books (13)
  2. 0.01 Humanism in Crisis (12)
  3. 0.02 Regionalisms (11)
  4. 0.03 Some Perils of Generalization (17)
  5. 0.04 Moralizing Pedagogy (6)
  6. 0.05 Seen and Not Heard (6)
  7. 0.06 Voices Nonetheless (3)
  8. 0.07 The Case of Francesco Negro (4)
  9. 0.08 Graphics Too (11)
  10. 0.09 Economics (3)
  11. 0.10 Cultural Appropriations (1)
  12. 0.11 Past and Future Histories (0)
  13. 1.00 CHAPTER ONE: From School Author to School Book: Terence in Manuscript and Print (0)
  14. 1.01 Why Terence? (1)
  15. 1.02 Terence in Mind (0)
  16. 1.03 School Authors (2)
  17. 1.04 Printing and the Canon (3)
  18. 1.05 Terence in Manuscript (1)
  19. 1.06 The Folio Terence (3)
  20. 1.07 Illustrating Terence (5)
  21. 1.08 Less Than Folio (1)
  22. 1.09 Octavo and Smaller Formats (2)
  23. 1.10 Giovanni Griffio & Co. (0)
  24. 1.11 Can You Sell Philology? (2)
  25. 1.12 Lazzaro Soardi's Mixed Messages (6)
  26. 1.13 More and More Advertising (0)
  27. 1.14 Teachers' Editions, Mid-Century and Beyond (3)
  28. 1.15 Design in Decline (0)
  29. 1.16 Vocabulary Drills and General Rules (4)
  30. 1.17 Giovanni Fabrini and Self-Study (3)
  31. 1.18 More Controversy (0)
  32. 1.19 Literary Joke or Careerism? (2)
  33. 1.20 Epilogue: On the Market (4)
  34. 2.00 CHAPTER TWO: Getting Started: Learning to Latinize (1)
  35. 2.01 Learning Reading / Learning Latin (1)
  36. 2.02 The Donat and the Cato (4)
  37. 2.03 Pseudo-Donatus (4)
  38. 2.04 Printing the Donat (2)
  39. 2.05 Red and Black (2)
  40. 2.06 Beyond the Donat (4)
  41. 2.07 Guarino Guarini of Verona (2)
  42. 2.08 Improving Guarino (0)
  43. 2.09 A Best Seller: Niccolò Perotti (1)
  44. 2.10 Advertising an Old Standby (1)
  45. 2.11 Humanist Critiques of the Donat (5)
  46. 2.12 Replacing the Donat (1)
  47. 2.13 Radical Grammarians (0)
  48. 2.14 Catonis Disticha (5)
  49. 2.15 Printing the Cato (7)
  50. 2.16 Packaging Morals (0)
  51. 2.17 Desiderius Erasmus, Ad Man (10)
  52. 2.18 Erasmus Picking Fights (6)
  53. 2.19 Kaspar Schoppe, Master Anthologizer (0)
  54. 2.20 How and Why to Drill (2)
  55. 2.21 Modern Teachers (0)
  56. 3.00 CHAPTER THREE: Antonio Mancinelli and the Humanist Classroom (0)
  57. 3.01 A Teacher in Print (1)
  58. 3.02 Advertising Oneself (0)
  59. 3.03 Printer's Errors (4)
  60. 3.04 Teaching With Print (0)
  61. 3.05 Urban Schools, Urban Patrons (1)
  62. 3.06 Elementary Schoolbooks (0)
  63. 3.07 Off to Rome (1)
  64. 3.08 Scholarly Work (2)
  65. 3.09 More Basic Schoolbooks (0)
  66. 3.10 In the Capital of Printing (1)
  67. 3.11 Presenting Cicero, Fixing Lorenzo Valla (0)
  68. 3.12 Impressing the Printers (0)
  69. 3.13 Midlife (0)
  70. 3.14 Late Works (3)
  71. 3.15 Collecting Himself (2)
  72. 3.16 Packaging Celebrity (0)
  73. 3.17 A Slippery Heritage (1)
  74. 3.18 Grammatical Publishing at the Turn of the Century (0)
  75. 4.00 CHAPTER FOUR: Crossing Borders: Northern Textbooks on the Italian Market (0)
  76. 4.01 Transitions / Translations (1)
  77. 4.02 Publishing Celebrity (1)
  78. 4.03 Despauterian Grammar (0)
  79. 4.04 Ciceronianisms (3)
  80. 4.05 De Spauter and the Reform of Pedagogy (0)
  81. 4.06 Re-Formatting the Reformer (0)
  82. 4.07 Josse Bade, Editor and Printer (0)
  83. 4.08 Advertising Grammar Books (2)
  84. 4.09 Jean Pellisson, Company Man (0)
  85. 4.10 Marketing a New De Spauter (0)
  86. 4.11 Late-Century Readings (0)
  87. 4.12 Textbook Packages (0)
  88. 4.13 Packaging Pedagogy Too (0)
  89. 4.14 Geographical Fiction and Fact (5)
  90. 4.15 Itineraries (4)
  91. 4.16 Toponomy (2)
  92. 4.17 Imported Geographies, Italian Packages (8)
  93. 4.18 Geography in Italian Classrooms (0)
  94. 4.19 Imports from the Empire of Latin (0)
  95. 5.00 CHAPTER FIVE: Universal and Instrumental: the Jesuit Grammar of Manuel Alvares (1)
  96. 5.01 Syntax Sells, Somewhat (0)
  97. 5.02 The Jesuit Market (2)
  98. 5.03 An Evolving Textbook (2)
  99. 5.04 Demands of the Market (0)
  100. 5.05 The Rhetoric of the Preface (0)
  101. 5.06 Addressing the Teachers (1)
  102. 5.07 Resistance is Futile (3)
  103. 5.08 In the Classroom (0)
  104. 5.09 Typography for the Classroom (0)
  105. 5.10 A View from Outside (5)
  106. 5.11 Adversus Emmanuelis Alvari (0)
  107. 5.12 Reviewing and Defending a Textbook (0)
  108. 5.13 Conservative Alternatives (0)
  109. 5.14 Conservative Typography (1)
  110. 5.15 A Radical Reformer (4)
  111. 5.16 Progressive Alternatives (0)
  112. 5.17 A Long Afterlife (2)
  113. 6.00 CHAPTER SIX: Vernacular Literacy, Commercial Education, and How To Do Stuff (4)
  114. 6.01 Class and Gender, In School and Out (2)
  115. 6.02 Alternative Educations (0)
  116. 6.03 Commercial Skills (1)
  117. 6.04 Better Arithmetic Books (6)
  118. 6.05 Math for the Future (2)
  119. 6.06 Bookkeeping Textbooks (0)
  120. 6.07 Who's Learning Math? (1)
  121. 6.08 Writing Manuals (11)
  122. 6.09 Advertising a Fine Hand (5)
  123. 6.10 Down-Market Handwriting Books (7)
  124. 6.11 Vernacular Literacy (1)
  125. 6.12 Catechism and Condescension (4)
  126. 6.13 Whither How-To? (0)
  127. 6.14 Ricettari (2)
  128. 6.15 Books to Formula (0)
  129. 6.16 Teaching Music Theory and Practice (5)
  130. 6.17 Poor Churchfolk (1)
  131. 6.18 Humanist Music Education (1)
  132. 6.19 Professionals or Amateurs? (7)
  133. 6.20 Conclusion: Into the Future (2)
  134. 7.00 CHAPTER SEVEN: Emblems in the Classroom (5)
  135. 7.01 Marketing and Moralizing (4)
  136. 7.02 Authors and Audiences (13)
  137. 7.03 Emblem as Machine (13)
  138. 7.04 Visualizing the Text (6)
  139. 7.05 Emblem Books (14)
  140. 7.06 Reading Emblems Every Day (16)
  141. 7.07 Title Page Emblems (8)
  142. 7.08 Trademarks Good or Bad? (3)
  143. 7.09 Classroom Title Pages (11)
  144. 7.10 Breaking the Rules (5)
  145. 7.11 Emblem Books in the Classroom (5)
  146. 7.12 Primers of Virtue (5)
  147. 7.13 Jesuit Emblems (3)
  148. 7.14 Chubby Children and the Blessed Virgin (2)
  149. 7.15 Italians Out of Step (6)
  150. 7.16 Conclusion: Schools of Emblematic Thought (6)
  151. 8.00 CONCLUSIONS: Selling Books and Selling Ideas (3)
  152. 8.01 A Market for Humanism (4)
  153. 8.02 The Rhetoric of Print (4)
  154. 8.03 Real and Rhetorical Innovations (0)
  155. 8.04 Profits (1)

About

Humanism For Sale is an experiment.  We are using the Word Press blog platform and the Comment Press theme to begin a dialog based on a new scholarly monograph about the creation and sale of school books in Europe between 1450 and 1650. For a description of the project and its background, see the web pages at www.humanismforsale.org. These pages also offer some advice for getting around the text if you are not used to blogging.

You are cordially invited to comment on any portion of Humanism For Sale in the comment fields that run parallel to the text. Simply click on the comment icon next to the portion of text that interests you, register once, and get a password that will allow you to comment as often as you like. Feel free to respond to other comments -- the whole point of using this software is to have a conversation. You may also quote and cite the text freely under the terms of its Creative Commons copyright statement. We recommend citing the text by section number.

Some readers may prefer to start with the fuller advice offered by the accompanying web pages. But in fact the software is easy to use and most people can just plunge in.

The text you see here is essentially a scholarly monograph in seven chapters:

Introduction:  The Problem of School Books

Chapter 1:  School Author to School Book: Terence in MS and Print

Chapter 2:  Learning to Latinize: Donatus, Cato and Beyond

Chapter 3:  Antonio Mancinelli and the Humanist Classroom

Chapter 4:  Crossing Borders: Northern Textbook on the Italian Market

Chapter 5:  Universal & Instrumental: The Jesuit Grammar of Manuel Alvares

Chapter 6:  Vernacular Literacy, Commercial Education, and How To Do Stuff

Chapter 7:  Emblems in the Classroom

Conclusion:  Selling Books and Selling Ideas

You can use the more detailed table of contents at left to find what most interests you in the book. The comparable contents column on the right will appear on every page, so you can move forward or back without returning to this page. The search box at top right will get you to keywords in the text. At the moment there are only a few illustrations in text, drawn from the collections of the Newberry Library. Clicking on the thumbnails will give you a larger image. Footnotes use abbreviated forms by reference to a full bibliography in the accompanying web pages.

As time permits we will provide more illustrations, better indexing, and additional gateways for readers who are not historians but who are interested in the history of design, marketing, and education.

Humanism For Sale is a project of the Newberry Library Center for Renaissance Studies (see http://www.newberry.org/renaissance/renaissancehome.html). A variety of additional backround information on this project and its author, Paul F. Gehl, an historian of printing on the staff of the Newberry Library, is available on the web pages at www.humanismforsale.org.